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DragonFly users List (threaded) for 2012-04
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Re: Mount Ext3 under DragonFlyBSD

From: David Crosswell <david.crosswell2@xxxxxxxxx>
Date: Sun, 29 Apr 2012 09:11:48 +1000

On 29/04/12 06:05, Donald Allen wrote:
> On Sat, Apr 28, 2012 at 3:36 PM,  <v_2e@ukr.net> wrote:
>> On Sat, 28 Apr 2012 12:03:15 -0400
>> Donald Allen <donaldcallen@gmail.com> wrote:
>>> I'm not quite seeing the point of why you are trying to substitute a
>>> BSD for Linux in this situation. And given that you have an ext3
>>> filesystem, I'm pretty sure it's the case that none of the BSDs
>>> support it. They only support ext2. So before turning a BSD loose on
>>> your ext3 filesystem, you would have to convert it to ext2 with Linux.
>>> This may not be a smart idea.
>>  I read somewhere that Ext3 is a kind of "backwards compatible" with
>> Ext2 in a sense that one can mount an Ext3 file system "in Ext2 mode",
>> i.e. without journalling. Is that right?
In case of an ext3 filesystem failure it will revert to ext2.
That's why it took over as the Linux default after ext2.
> No, I believe that is not right. You can *convert* an ext3 filesystem
> into an ext2 filesystem and vice-versa. See the url I sent you in my
> previous message.
>>  If it is, then it must be possible to mount the Ext3 file system as
>> Ext2 on *BSD, isn't it?
> Only if you convert it to ext2.
>>  As for the reasons for me to switch to DragonFlyBSD, the only REAL
>> one is that I want to get some experience in *BSD administration. This
>> is not my desktop machine, so it is not a big problem if it doesn't
>> work for some time. And also the GNU/Linux distribution I used on this
>> machine was quite outdated, and I experienced some problems with it from
>> time to time. So I decided to try something different and just see how
>> it works.
>>  Summarizing all said, it would be useful to come to a conclusion
>> about a good way to have a file system shared between DragonFlyBSD and
>> GNU/Linux. What is a good (wise) way of achieving it?
What on earth is the matter with UFS, of, if you have the resources, ZFS?
Both are very stable.
I'm sorry, but this appears to be an exercise in pseudo-intellectualism.

Even ext3 three has been superceded now, in the Linux world, by any
number of standards - see xfs, ext4, jfs, and even reiser.
All soon to be superceded by btrfs, as soon as it matures and that's not
far away.

There are any number of ways you can run two different OSs on the one
Just use gparted or similar to resize partitions and eureka.

David Crosswell.
> You say you want to learn about BSD system administration. You also
> say, in effect, that this machine is not that important. You also say
> your Linux install is outdated. So why not concentrate on finding a
> way to dump the damned filesystem (to your desktop machine via nfs if
> you can't afford to buy a USB drive?), install the BSD of your dreams
> with a native filesystem -- UFS, ZFS, Hammer, whatever -- and restore
> the data to that? Sharing between Dragonfly and Linux is going to
> amount to finding something that is supported well by both. That may
> not exist, since it appears that Dragonfly's ext2 code was taken from
> a very old FreeBSD and Linux' UFS support is apparently also
> questionable. You seem to be intent on inflicting pain on yourself. If
> you choose to do that, go ahead. I've already given you my best
> advice. Good luck!
> /Don
>>  Thanks.
>>    Vladimir
>> -----
>>  <v_2e@ukr.net>

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